Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Bon Jovi Helps Open Low-Income Housing in Philly

Jon Bon Jovi's hit tune "Who Says You Can't Go Home?" took on new meaning Tuesday as the rock star cut the ribbon on a namesake housing development for low-income residents and the formerly homeless in Philadelphia.
 
The 55-unit JBJ Soul Homes opened in the Francisville neighborhood after about 18 months of construction. Bon Jovi's Soul Foundation provided the lead gift for the $16.6 million complex, which he hopes will offer tenants the support they need to get back on their feet.
"This is not a handout, it's just a hand up," Bon Jovi said in an interview before the official ceremony. "This opportunity for them is special and it's not easy to come by."
 
The four-story building, which was financed by public and private funds, also includes retail and office space. Residents will receive social services from Project HOME, a nonprofit dedicated to ending homelessness in Philadelphia. HOME stands for Housing, Opportunities, Medical and Education.
 
JBJ Soul Homes is "taking our work to a whole new level," said Project HOME co-founder Sister Mary Scullion.
 
The grand opening of the facility, which coincides with the agency's 25th anniversary, is part of an initiative to build 500 such units across the city, Scullion said. Two developments totaling nearly 200 units are scheduled for groundbreaking over the coming year, she said.
 
Residents of JBJ Soul Homes will have access to basic medical care, employment training and educational classes; they are required to contribute part of their income toward rent. Several units have been set aside for young adults to help them transition out of programs for homeless teens.
One new resident, 53-year-old Anthony Gulley, said he had been sleeping in a local park when outreach workers from Project HOME began talking to him. Although resistant at first, Gulley said he eventually agreed to come in from the cold.
 
He stayed at a couple of shelters and attended regular counseling sessions before qualifying for JBJ Soul Homes. He now hopes to get a barber's license.
"I'm getting myself back together, and this is a big, big step," Gulley said. "When they give you the help, you have to be willing to do what they ask you to do. It's beautiful."
Bon Jovi has previously shown brotherly love to the city's less fortunate, supporting the Covenant House for homeless youths and helping to rebuild dilapidated row houses in gritty north Philadelphia.
JBJ Soul Homes functions as a small but crucial safety net "by providing shelter and an integrated array of services to so many of Philadelphia's most vulnerable youth and adults," he said.
The first JBJ Soul Home was built in Newark, N.J. Bon Jovi's foundation has also worked in Detroit, Los Angeles and Louisiana.
 
The New Jersey native once co-owned the Philadelphia Soul arena football team.

Teen Summer Job and Opportunities Fair on April 26 Youth Ages 14 - 21

Teen Summer Job and Opportunities Fair on April 26 Youth Ages 14 - 21

In need of a job this summer? Look no further than the Teen Summer Job and Opportunities Fair on Saturday, April 26 from 10 AM to 4 PM. With a free lunch! And, being held at the Howard Gittis Student Center in Temple University. 1755 N. 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122
Join your peers from around the city as we help to get you prepared for the upcoming summer. Explore a variety of businesses and organizations for information about jobs, internships, employment training, and volunteer opportunities.
Register with EventBrite at:
 
For more information contact:
Christin Bell, coordinator
Fun Safe Philly Summer

The Impact of Sugar on Your Body


The “Holiday Hangover” and 4 Other Strange Ways Sugar Impacts Your Body


How many candy eggs or chocolate bunnies did you consume yesterday? Perhaps you had one too many – as most people do. Maybe it was your intention to stop at the ear, but you went ahead and ate the whole bunny!!

Humans have always had a love affair of sorts with sugar. About 10,000 years ago, the closest thing to a Starburst the people living on the island of New Guinea (the birthplace of sugar) got was chewing on a piece of raw sugar cane.

Priests sipped sugar sweetened water from a coconut shell, and popular myths even included one about a man who made love to a stalk of sugar cane, creating a whole new human race.

Today, these and other such religious ceremonies have been replaced by social gatherings focused around soda, donuts and lattes. The first processing of raw sugar cane happened around 500 AD in India. The cane was turned into a powder and used medicinally for stomach problems, impotence, headaches and more. For a very long time, sugar remained a secret that few knew about, until wealthy Persians in 600 AD treated guests with a variety of sweet treats.

The Arabs perfected sugar refinement and created an industry around it – although it was a very brutal and physically challenging process where workers labored in the fields and in smoke-filled rooms to make the fine powder.

The minute the British and French tasted sugar, they fell in love, but only the wealthy could afford it, and deemed it a spice.

When Columbus set off on his second journey, he brought sugar cane with him to the Caribbean islands. Soon after, the age of big sugar production and slave plantations began. Mass production of sugar was in full swing, and before long was accompanied by production of XXL clothing and a surge of modern illnesses.

Compared to our ancestors who may have consumed about an ounce of sugar a day, we gobble up almost seven ounces a day – much without even knowing we are doing so. Dietary guidelines established by the American Heart Association indicate that men should not consume over nine teaspoons of sugar a day, and women should not consume more than six. Sadly, we are consuming a whopping twenty-two teaspoons a day on average.

Would you be surprised if we told you that of the 600,000 or so foods that are manufactured and consumed in the United States, over 80 percent of them contain added sugar? But, you say, you don’t see sugar listed as an ingredient on the label. Well, the food manufacturers have it covered – sugar actually has over 50 different names, meaning that the food industry can easily pull one over on us by listing each of these ingredients separately.

Furthermore, as they list these ingredients on the label, they may appear as ingredient #3, #4, #7 and so on – so even if they are not the #1 ingredient, when you total up their presence, they do in fact become the #1 ingredient. Pretty crafty, aren’t they? The US Department of Agriculture reports that Americans consume about 156 pounds of added sugar annually, or over 31 five-pound bags per person.

Most of this sugar is probably consumed without the consumer even knowing it. If you eat packaged, bottled or canned foods with more than five ingredients, or ingredients you cannot pronounce, chances are you are eating extra sugar.

While the debate ensues as to whether or not sugar is actually toxic, most health professionals agree that it offers no nutritional value and may be alarmingly dangerous when consumed in large amounts.

Many who have done research on the evolution of sugar note that the evolution of illness seems to parallel this white powder. Nephrologist Richard Johnson from the University of Colorado – Denver states that one-third of all adults have high blood pressure today, while in 1900 only five percent suffered.

In 1980, 153 million people had diabetes, today that number has ballooned to 347 million. Right alongside the development of these, and other serious lifestyle illnesses, has been an increase in the use of sugar in the food manufacturing industry. Seems just a little too ironic, doesn’t it?

If you are not yet convinced to pay close attention to your sugar consumption, pay close attention to these five (only five of many) ways that science has proven sugar insults your body. Perhaps after you read this you will feel differently.

Sugar makes your internal organs obese

So, if your organs are obese will you appear obese on the outside? Not necessarily – and this is what makes this insult so incredibly dangerous. Fructose, a part of table sugar, along with high-fructose corn syrup, causes the liver to store fat in strange places.

Prolonged, high consumption of fructose can least to globules of fat building up around the liver – this is a precursor to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Interestingly enough, this condition was rarely seen before 1980.

Sugar makes your blood vessels tense

Excess sugar prompts the body to release excess insulin into the bloodstream. This extra insulin wreaks havoc on our circulatory system and arteries. If insulin levels remain high for long periods of time, it causes the smooth muscle cells around blood vessels to expand rapidly – much faster than normal. When artery walls become tense, it puts you at a much higher risk of high blood pressure, stroke and heart attack.

Sugar ages your skin fast

Sugar is right alongside smoking and unsafe sun exposure as the top three ways to age your skin fast. Collagen and elastin are skin support structures that get broken down from sun or other free radical exposure – this process works well when we are young, but as we age it slows down.

When sugar is present in the skin, it forms cross-links with amino acids that may have been damaged by free radicals. These cross-links are like roadblocks to the repair process. Dermatologist William Dandy, MD, states that once they are formed, the cross-links do not unhitch. Over time, your skin will look much older than it should.

Note: Consider adding cinnamon, ginger, cloves and garlic to your diet. These spices seem to slow down the cross-linking process.

Sugar makes you crave more sugar

Author of the book Salt, Sugar, Fat, Michael Moss, says, “our bodies are hard-wired for sweets.” Research just released out of Connecticut College seems to agree with Moss. After conducting an experiment involving Oreo cookies and rats, researchers are making the bold claim that the cookies are as addictive as cocaine.

This probably comes as no surprise to those of you who find that you can’t just have one Oreo. Professor Schroeder, study supervisor, remarked that the rats who ate the cookies, loaded with unhealthy fat and sugar, experienced a reaction in the same pleasure center of the brain as the rats who were exposed to cocaine or morphine. In fact, the Oreos more strongly impacted the pleasure center than did the cocaine.

“Our research supports the theory that high-fat/high-sugar foods stimulate the brain in the same way that drugs do,” Schroeder said. “It may explain why some people can’t resist these foods despite the fact that they know they are bad for them.”

While this study picks on Oreos, it is important to note that there is nothing inherently different about these cookies over other high sugar processed foods including ice cream, cake, candy and such. What the study did confirm was what Moss said: the body is definitely hard-wired to love sugar.

Too much sugar causes a headache

The sugar headache is often called the “holiday hangover,” because it seem to happen right after major holidays such as Christmas, Easter, birthdays – or any other time when we consume excessive amounts of sugar. The symptoms are similar to an alcohol-induced hangover, including a pounding headache, irritability and fatigue.

When you consume large amounts of sugar at one time, the body pulls fluid from different places to balance out the impact it has on the blood. When this happens, the head suffers most, and this can lead to a headache.

Sugar headaches may also be a warning of something much more dangerous – diabetes. If you have headaches often, reflect back on what you have eaten – was it a lot of sugar? If you also have problems with frequent urination, excessive hunger or thirst, see a medical practitioner for a blood sugar test.

Tips

§  Be very careful of processed “whole grain” products, although they may be marketed as healthy. If you think switching from white bread to whole wheat bread is a healthy option, you may want to reconsider. The wheat kernels in commercial whole grain products are smashed to a dust, which causes the same type of sugar spike that happens when we eat white bread. Best to stay clear of all wheat products – whole or otherwise.

§  Stop drinking sugar-laden drinks and replace them with fresh water, fresh juice or healthy organic teas. If you want something sweet, stick to the sugar found in natural fruit. An orange contains 12 grams of natural sugar, while a glass of orange juice contains 22 grams. Be careful of so-called healthy products like commercial smoothies – they can contain as much as 14 teaspoons of added sugar.

§  Fill your body with whole foods rich in healthy fats and organic fruits and vegetables. A well-nourished body craves less sugar/processed fat than one that is nutrient-deprived. Start your day with a savory breakfast – a hearty breakfast that contains healthy saturated fat will help keep the cravings at bay. Choose an omelet with real butter from grass-fed cows over a dry cereal or a bagel.

One step at a time, you can get a handle on your sugar consumption, and before long, you will notice a tremendous difference in how you look and feel.

-The Alternative Daily

 

Monday, April 21, 2014

Job Posting - Director of Communications


 

Director of Communications

 

Description: The Barnes Foundation is seeking a Director of Communications to be responsible for creating and executing proactive communications strategies to promote the Barnes Foundation and its collections, exhibitions, classes and workshops, as well as public programs and events. The Director of Communications builds positive relationships and works across all departments to write content for multi-platform dissemination, develop story ideas and photo opportunities for local, national and international media and develop communications systems for internal and external audiences.

 

Established as an educational institution the Barnes Foundation carries out its mission by promoting appreciation of the arts and horticultural science, through the preservation, presentation, and interpretation of the collections of Albert C. and Laura L. Barnes.

 

Celebrated for its exceptional breadth, depth, and quality, the Barnes Foundation's art collection includes works by some of the greatest European and American masters of impressionism, post-impressionist, and early modern art, as well as African sculpture, Pennsylvania German decorative arts, Native American textiles, metalwork, and more. The 12-acre Arboretum contains over 3,000 species of woody plants and trees.

 

The Foundation engages diverse audiences through its exceptional collections and related high-quality programs that reflect a broad range of periods and cultures and build on the founders’ innovative educational vision of transforming lives through the arts and horticulture.

           

Responsibilities:

 

Public Relations

  • Proactively cultivates relationships with the local, national and international art & culture press and with all local media outlets;
  • Designs and implements proactive/strategic public relations campaigns for the Barnes;
  • Plans and implements press conferences for exhibitions and major milestone events;
  • Speaks on behalf of the Barnes Foundation at the request of and with direction from the Senior Vice President for Communications;
  • Prepares the Executive Director or other Executive Staff members and trustees for interviews and public appearances;
  • Writes and effectively distributes press releases; clears content with appropriate parties;
  • Manages and provides content for Barnes Blog and recruit content providers
  • Oversees and provides content across all current social media platforms and explores new platforms as they develop;
  • In consultation with the General Counsel, drafts formal responses for the Executive Director and trustees to inquiries, letters to the editor, and other situations when the record must be set straight, demonstrating a complete knowledge of Barnes background, legal history, the collections, and the nature of changing institutional priorities and expansion;
  • Prepares/researches/writes background for positioning papers, promotional writing for press releases, newsletters, Executive Director’s correspondence for public appearances and public presentations including speechwriting and remark preparation for the Board and staff;
  • Engages third party subject experts to advocate for the Barnes on timely topics;
  • Oversees film and television crews;
  • Participates in collaborations with sister cultural institutions; develops related community positioning.

 

Internal/External communications

  • Collaborates with members of staff to create proactive institutional messaging for the Barnes;
  • In accordance with style guides, provides standard and customized text,  oversees creative design of informational mailings, brochures, and educational information;

  • Drafts accurate, timely communications vehicles based on relevant key messages, special achievements, exhibitions, classes and workshops, public programs, special events and calendar updates;
  • Formulates and updates Foundation FAQs for internal (board, staff, volunteers)and external audiences; distributes broadly and holds training sessions when needed;
  • nsures clarity, accuracy and timeliness of information; participates in planning website updates and redesigns;
  • In collaboration with Marketing Manager, provides editorial oversight of e-newsletters, advertisements and other print and electronic content.
  • Completes other duties as assigned.

 

Brand identity and graphic design

  • Ensures all communications materials meet brand identity, design and messaging standards.

 

Rights and Reproductions

  • With the Director of Publications, and Visual Resource Manager, identifies key images and negotiates with third parties for rights and reproductions, website, publications, print, and other media projects;  and
  • With Webmaster and Visual Resources Manager, collaboratively selects preferred images and ensembles with high didactic value for use across all platforms and for rights negotiations.

 

Budget preparation and administration

  • Monitors and achieves approved revenue and expense targets.

 

Skills and Knowledge:

 

  • 4-year degree, preferably in marketing, communications or public relations
  • 5 + years relevant experience in a complex business or not-for-profit marketing environment
  • 3 + years relevant experience in a museum or visual arts organization
  • Proven ability to write, edit and design communications materials for institutional messaging across all departments
  • Demonstrated effective supervisory experience

 

Competitive Benefits Include: Group health and dental insurance; flexible spending accounts; short and long term disability and group life insurance; 403(b) with matching contributions; Employee Assistance Program; voluntary benefits; as well as paid vacation, personal time, sick time and holidays.

 

To Apply: Please apply online:

 


 

Please create a single document that includes your cover letter, resume and the names of three professional references to upload with your application. Applications that fail to fulfill this requirement will not be accepted.

 

The Barnes Foundation is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug-Free Workplace. We participate in E-Verify.

Job Posting - Shop Sales Associate



Barnes Shop Sales Associate

 

Description: The Barnes Foundation is seeking two Part-time, temporary Shop Sales Associates for the Parkway location. It is anticipated that these positions will be 4-5 months in duration.

 

Shop Sales Associates work in the Barnes Shop, greeting visitors, answering questions about the store and its merchandise, transacting sales, and maintaining the sales floor. Associates also sell Memberships to the Barnes Foundation, and deliver consistent customer service that reflects favorably on the Foundation and the Shop.

 

Sales Associates must be able to work flexible hours, including evenings and weekends.

 

Established as an educational institution the Barnes Foundation carries out its mission by promoting appreciation of the arts and horticultural science, through the preservation, presentation, and interpretation of the collections of Albert C. and Laura L. Barnes.

 

Celebrated for its exceptional breadth, depth, and quality, the Barnes Foundation's art collection includes works by some of the greatest European and American masters of impressionism, post-impressionist, and early modern art, as well as African sculpture, Pennsylvania German decorative arts, Native American textiles, metalwork, and more. The 12-acre Arboretum contains over 3,000 species of woody plants and trees.

 

The Foundation engages diverse audiences through its exceptional collections and related high-quality programs that reflect a broad range of periods and cultures and build on the founders’ innovative educational vision of transforming lives through the arts and horticulture.

 

Responsibilities:

   

  • Greet Customers, answer visitor questions about the store and its merchandise

·         Provide a helpful, welcoming and informative environment for visitors to the Foundation. Answer general visitor questions about the Barnes Foundation, its collections, its history, visitor resources, etc.

·         Operate Point of Sale system, including transacting sales (cash, check and credit card payments), count money, provide change and receipts, and balance drawers

·         Sell memberships to the Barnes Foundation

  • Follow Shop procedures for opening/closing tasks
  • Work with Supervisors to maintain the selling floor in a fully stocked and visually presentable condition
  • Deliver consistent levels of customer service that reflect favorably on the Foundation and the Shop
  • Perform other duties as required by supervisor

 

Requirements:

 

·         Demonstrated sales success in retail environment

·         Strong Customer Service skills

·         Cash handling experience

·         Strong verbal, telephone, and general communication skills

·         Ability to work independently as well as on a team

·         Background or knowledge in history, fine art

·         Must be able to operate a computerized point-of-sale system

·         Reliable, high level of personal integrity

·         Bilingual or non-English language skills an asset

 

To Apply: Please apply online

 


 

 

Please create a single document that includes your cover letter, resume and three professional references to upload with your application. Applications that fail to fulfill this requirement will not be accepted.

 

 

The Barnes Foundation is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug Free Workplace.

We participate in E-Verify.

 

Americans are Taking the Wrong Supplements or the Wrong Dose

Americans are Taking the Wrong Supplements or the Wrong Dose

[title]
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People want to improve their health are finally realizing that supplements can play a role in getting healthy – but American's spend $15 billion on supplements a year and don't always know what to take according to Michael A. Smith. MD, author of the newly released The Supplement Pyramid – How to Build Your Personalized Nutritional Regimen. That's what Smith told the more than 100 members of the national and regional broadcast and print media and book authors who attended the National Publicity Summit in New York City at the Hotel Pennsylvania April 3-6.
One of the most common questions said Smith, who is also radio host of Healthy Talk on RadioMD.com and senior health scientist with Life Extension hears from people is: "I eat a pretty healthy diet. Do I really need to take supplements?" His answer is always a resounding "Yes!" And there is a very good reason.
In The Supplement Pyramid, published by Basic Health Publications, Inc., with a foreword written by health advocate, author and talk show host Suzanne Somers, Smith covers the many reasons why even the healthiest diets fall short in terms of supplying the optimal amount of nutrients we need not just to survive, but also to thrive. However, with such a staggering amount of choices on the market, it's easy to become overwhelmed. That's where The Supplement Pyramid enters the picture.
Like traditional food pyramids that help us design and follow a healthy diet, The Supplement Pyramid is an educational tool that can be personalized to meet anyone's specific nutritional needs. With its three-tiered plan—foundational, personalization, and optimization levels—the Supplement Pyramid helps readers design a nutritional regimen that meets their unique needs. Step-by-step instructions and detailed medical quizzes, along with useful information about blood testing, help readers determine the most important nutritional supplements for their bodies—and this becomes an ideal personalized menu from which to choose.
"Knowing which supplements to take is only half the battle," Smith told media folks who cover health topics on their television and radio shows and in their newspapers. "Purchasing high-quality nutritional supplements is essential for success," adds Smith.
Smith covers all of the information readers need to know to be sure they are making the best investment in their health. Written in easy-to-understand language and providing a wealth of vital information, The Supplement Pyramid puts all the questions to rest so we can each move toward an optimal personalized supplement regimen.
The 323-page book hard cover edition from Basic Health Publications retailing for $24.95 is complemented by an interactive website – MySupplementPyramid.com – featuring numerous health quizzes. The website quizzes identify individual health issues and are not the typical questions found in many mainstream health, wellness and lifestyle magazines.
"The questions in each quiz ask about current symptoms and disease risk factors," says Smith. "These are the same questions your doctor would ask you during an office visit. Based on your answers, a score for each quiz is generated. Your score comes with specific, evidenced-based supplement suggestions aimed at treating, preventing and reducing risk of disease," notes Smith.
There are numerous books and blogs and videos that promote the benefits of specific nutrients, like omega-3 oils, antioxidants and herbal extracts, but after reading these resources so many people are still left asking, "Do I need to take this?" This is why Smith wrote The Supplement Pyramid.
By completing the assessments Smith developed, people can finally know which supplements are best for them and which ones they can probably do without. Additionally, the supplement pyramid prioritizes their supplements as well. The importance of the supplements to a given regimen decrease moving up the pyramid.
"My book clearly explains how all of this works," said Smith. "After reading the book and taking the quizzes, you can have a supplement regimen that's personalized and prioritized."

Job Posting - Assistant Store Manager

Champs Sports is opening a store in the King of Prussia, PA area and is seeking sports business enthusiasts looking to jump-start their career in the sport and entertainment industry.
Did you know many professional teams have retail store operations, and sports sales and service professionals are often hired from retail?
As part of Champs’ talented team, your primary focus is to create a warm and friendly shopping environment by providing extreme customer service. Can you assist in leading your store team to provide this service by assisting in selling, employee management, customer relations, stock, visual merchandising, asset protection, and training?

The opportunity here is fantastic. Why not work here? Come for the opportunity….Stay for the career!
This job is only going to be posted until April 18th, so apply online now!

Assistant Store Manager - Champs Sports (King of Prussia, PA)
http://www.teamworkonline.com/teamwork/r.cfm?i=66269