Tuesday, August 2, 2016

6 Health Benefits Of Adding Just 1,000 Extra Steps A Day

Walking up steps outside

You've probably heard that logging 10,000 steps daily can help you control your weight and keep you healthy. But if you have an office job, spend a lot of time driving, or are constantly pressed for time, shooting for that number can seem overwhelming—if not downright impossible. Should you resign yourself to being a couch potato/desk jockey? Hardly!

While getting 10,000 steps (or more) is a great goal, upping your current activity level by just a little—say, an additional 1,000 steps—has solid health perks, say experts. What's more, almost anyone can tack on this seemingly small amount of movement, says Harley Pasternak, ACSM-CPT, IDEA master trainer and New York Times best-selling author of The Body Reset Diet.
Take a second to ponder the math, and you'll see that it really does add up: 1,000 steps clocks out to about half a mile, which works out to an extra 365,000 steps a year. "That's nearly 180 miles of extra movement, and it will absolutely change the way you look and feel," says Pasternak. Here are some of the perks that come with moving just a little more: 

1. Your heart won't have to work so hard.
"Simply going from being sedentary to engaging in even modest levels of activity dramatically improves your health and begins decreasing your risk of heart disease," says Michele Olson, PhD, a professor of exercise physiology at Auburn University at Montgomery. Movement makes your muscles better able to pump blood throughout the body, so your heart rate comes down.

2. You'll slash your stroke risk.
Extra activity directly reduces your chances of having a stroke. It also helps keep your blood pressure in check—which further reduces your stroke risk. Double win!
3. Your cholesterol levels may improve.
Got high LDL, the "bad" kind of cholesterol? Taking an extra 1,000 steps a day may be enough to make a difference. "When you move more, you burn up cholesterol and other lipids in your bloodstream so they have less of a chance of invading and damaging your blood vessels," explains Olson.

4. You'll stress less.
Taking a short, brisk walk may really be the best way to clear your head and lift yourself out of a funk. The physiological reason is twofold: When you exercise, your body produces feel-good chemicals called endorphins. Physical activity also cuts levels of cortisol—a stress hormone that can make you feel lousy and raise your risk of a slew of mental and physical health problems, says Pasternak.

5. Your bones will get stronger.
According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, any type of weight-bearing activity can strengthen your skeleton and fight osteoporosis. Why? Placing weight on your bones makes them work harder, explains Olson. That pressure stimulates cells called osteoblasts, which can turn into new brand-new bone cells.
6. You may lose weight. 
OK, so you probably won't shed a ton quickly, but over time there's a payoff. Taking an extra 10,000 steps means you'll torch about 50 more calories a day, or 350 a week, says Nadya Swedan, MD, a board-certified physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist. "In about 10 weeks, you'll be able to notice any pounds you've started to drop." (Walk off 22 pounds in just 8 weeks and get an MP3 player with Prevention's Walk Off Weight!)

To reap any—or all—of these benefits, you'll need to make extra activity a regular thing. "A thousand additional steps a day really add up, but consistency is key," says Pasternak. Some easy ways to make it a habit include snagging the furthest (rather than closest) parking spot to your office door, marching around while you're talking on the phone, and ditching your coffee pot so you have to walk to a local shop for your morning cup.

5 Ways Lemons Help Heal Your Body

fresh-lemons-are-great-for-health

Most people agree that lemons are good for our health. Many of us have heard that adding a dash of lemon juice to water can provide all kinds of body-nurturing benefits. When asked to list those benefits, however, the vast majority of us would probably be lost for words.
Here’s a helping hand: Lemons are healthy because they’re high in vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin E, and B vitamins; they contain an impressive collection of essential minerals; they are alkalizing, detoxifying, and they’re antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory… to name a few of the many wonderful things lemons can do. If that isn’t enough to convince every single person who has even the slightest interest in their health to start consuming lemons every day, perhaps these five additional reasons will help.
1. Lemons fight sickness Lemons bolster the immune system — it’s probably the best-known benefit of lemons, but it’s still worth discussing. The high concentration of ascorbic acid, otherwise known as vitamin C, found in lemons is an essential component of a healthy, functioning immune system. Not only that, lemons are high in potassium, which protects your brain and nerves from cellular damage. Lemons also contain saponins, which have antimicrobial properties that fight off cold and flu viruses.
Lemons discourage the excessive production of mucus in your body, and make it easier to break down, meaning you’re less likely to get all gunked up and beset by coughing fits. The anti-inflammatory properties of the vitamin C in lemon also encourage strong respiratory health and discourage respiratory conditions like asthma.
2. Lemons restore a healthy internal pH
Sure, lemons contain loads of citric and ascorbic acid, meaning they’re acidic before you eat them, but once you swallow that lemon water or pulp, these acids are broken down. The combination of minerals contained within that yellow goodness is released into your digestive system, thereby alkalizing your blood.
What’s the significance of all this pH mumbo jumbo? Well, it turns out that most common diseases occur in an acidic environment. The more acidic your blood is, the more susceptible you are to disease or sickness. Consuming lemon on a regular basis can therefore lower your risk of developing a disease or health condition.
3. Lemons aid in the digestion process
The acidic profile of lemons is very similar to the digestive fluids found in your stomach. Therefore, eating lemon pulp or drinking lemon juice can trick your liver into producing bile. As a result, the food you eat moves through your digestive system more smoothly and doesn’t overstress your gastrointestinal system.
The digestive benefits of consuming lemons doesn’t stop there. The ascorbic and citric acids found in lemons encourage your digestive system to break down foods in your stomach at a slower rate. This is good news for your health, as it means you absorb more nutrients from the food you eat and your insulin levels remain steady, rather than spiking.
4. Lemons ward off free radicals
You’ve probably heard of these guys before (or perhaps the band, if you’re familiar with the 90s pop music scene), but you may not know what kind of havoc these little critters are wreaking in your body every single day. Free radicals are arguably one of the greatest causative factors for aging. The oxidative damage they impose results in cell death, and in some cases, the development of cancer.
The high concentration of vitamin C found in lemons is the natural enemy of free radicals. Vitamin C is one of the most powerful antioxidants available to us (anti-oxidant — get it?). Vitamin C not only helps our body to heal itself faster and prevent the development of cellular mutation, it also keeps our skin looking young and producing collagen, which ensures it stays hydrated and prevents wrinkles.
5. Lemons detoxify the body
Lemons promote the removal of toxins from the body in a number of ways. Firstly, they increase urination frequency, meaning the body can remove undesirable or harmful compounds and minerals at a faster rate. Secondly, the high level of citric acid found in lemons encourages increased enzyme production in the liver, which is the primary organ responsible for eliminating toxins from the body. So, the next time you have a few too many glasses of wine and wake up with a throbbing headache the following morning, a nice glass of warm lemon water might be just the ticket.
Want to get the most out of lemons, but not sure how? This article should help.
—Liivi Hess

6 Reasons To Eat More Real Butter

6 Reasons To Eat More Real Butter

eat-more-real-butter-for-health

Humans have been consuming butter for about 10,000 years. Yet, when it comes to heart disease and obesity, it’s still widely misunderstood. Recently, new research has shed new light on the cardiometabolic benefits of dairy products and dairy fat. Consuming real butter may be beneficial, not detrimental, for your health.
1. Real butter is the real deal.
One of the biggest misconceptions is that margarine is actually better for you than real butter, which is made by churning the fatty portion of cow’s milk until it turns into butter. Margarine, on the other hand is highly processed, and was invented to replace butter. The main ingredient in margarine is vegetable oil. Emulsifiers, colorants and various artificial ingredients are used to create the look and taste of butter. Several studies link polyunsaturated vegetable oils, often found in margarine, with cancer, violence and the very thing margarine is supposed to prevent, heart disease.
2. It lowers your risk of diabetes.
Recent research published in the journal PLOS ONE suggests that eating real butter, preferably raw and grass-fed, has more of a neutral association with mortality rather than causing mortality. In fact, there is no significant association between butter consumption and heart health, according to the paper. While one tablespoon of butter daily was associated with a one percent higher risk of death, interestingly, it lowered the risk of type 2 diabetes by four percent.
3. Trans fats in butter are healthy.
Unlike the trans fats found in processed foods, dairy trans fats are considered to be healthy. In fact, butter is the richest dietary source of dairy trans fats, also called ruminant trans fats. The most common ruminant trans fats are vaccenic acid and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA).
CLA has been associated with health benefits such as protecting against certain cancers thanks to its anticarcinogenic component, suggests research from the Human Nutrition Program.
4. It contains rich source of vitamins and minerals.
Since butter is normally consumed in smaller portions, the vitamins found in butter only contribute to the total daily requirement. The following vitamins are found in high amounts in butter:
  • Vitamin A is the most plentiful vitamin found in butter, with one tablespoon providing about 11 percent of the daily-recommended allowance.
  • Butter is also a good source of vitamin D, E, B12 and K2 (a form of vitamin K, also called menaquinone that is thought to protect against cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis.)
5. It reduces the risk of obesity and promotes weight loss.
A study published in the European Journal of Health suggests that butter, when eaten in normal amounts as a part of a healthy diet, may actually reduce the risk of obesity. In fact, 11 out of 16 studies suggested that high-fat dairy intake was inversely associated or showed no association with obesity and metabolic health.
Additionally, clinical research from Norway suggests that the CLA found in butter also promotes weight loss.
6. Grass-fed and raw is better butter. 
Grass-fed butter, it turns out, contains five times more CLA than butter from grain-fed cows, which means greater health benefits. Unfortunately, raw dairy is not available in all states, but you can ask your local farmer’s market if they know of any good sources in your area.
Pasteurization destroys the chemical structure of butter’s proteins, fats and carbohydrates. Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride for Eco Watch says, “it kills the beneficial bacteria and destroys enzymes and vitamins,” which makes pasteurized milk harder to digest.
The bottom line: Not only does butter taste better than margarine, it’s a natural product that humans have been cooking with and eating for thousands of years. Why use a synthetic and somewhat unpleasant-tasting spread, often laced with additives and cheap, low-grade oils, when we now know that butter eaten in moderation, is the healthier alternative?
–Katherine Marko

21 Reasons To Eat More Carrots

21 Reasons To Eat More Carrots

carrots-are-great-for-health

They’re crunchy, they’re sweet, rabbits love them… I’m talking, of course, about carrots. Carrots are one of the most commonly eaten veggies in the United States, and for good reason. These delectable roots can do wonders for your health. The following are 21 reasons to get more carrots into your snacks, meals, juices… wherever!
Benefit from an impressive array of nutrients
Carrots are rich in vitamins, including vitamin A, several B vitamins, vitamin C, vitamin E and vitamin K. They also contain fiber and the minerals biotin, copper, folate and potassium, to name just a few. Enjoy a wealth of antioxidants
The antioxidant profile of carrots packs a punch and includes beta-carotene, lutein and anthocyanidins. Vitamins A, C and E are also potent antioxidants.
Reduce chronic inflammation
Thanks to the vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants found in carrots, these veggies can help to lower chronic inflammation. If your body is inflamed over the long-term, diseases can develop and fester. Getting chronic inflammation under control is key!
Improve your eyesight
Eating carrots can help to protect your eyes because they are high in beta-carotene, an antioxidant which converts to vitamin A in the body. A diet rich in beta-carotene can help to prevent night blindness and may also reduce the risk of macular degeneration, a common eye condition in elderly people.
Give your skin a healthy glow
The vitamins and antioxidants found in carrots help to fight free radicals throughout the body, and free radical overgrowth is one big culprit of lines, wrinkles and other signs of aging. On top of that, vitamin E is a very important vitamin for keeping skin looking youthful and radiant.
Boost your immune system
Although carrots are most famous for their vitamin A content, they also contain an ample amount of vitamin C, which is imperative for the proper function of the immune system. Eating plenty of this vitamin can help your body to fight off all kinds of diseases and illnesses.
Support healthy digestion
Carrots are rich in fiber, which is important for keeping you regular. Fiber helps to keep things moving through your body, and if you do not eat enough of it, you may experience constipation, diarrhea or other digestive discomforts. Carrots contain both soluble and insoluble fiber, both of which are necessary for healthy digestion.
Lower heart disease risk
The fiber, nutrients, and antioxidants found in carrots also help to protect your heart. Orange and yellow vegetables such as carrots have been found to be especially protective against cardiovascular disease.
Reduce your risk of stroke
Research has found that a diet high in antioxidants, and especially in vitamin C, can help to reduce stroke risk. Carrots have antioxidants in spades and a good dose of vitamin C.
Balance your blood pressure
Carrots contain potassium, a necessary mineral for keeping your blood pressure under control. They also contain coumarin, which has also been found by research to lower blood pressure.
Regulate your blood sugar
Research has found that a diet rich in carotenoids may be associated with improving insulin resistance and combating diabetes.
Fight cancer
A number of studies have found that eating foods high in beta-carotene may help to prevent various cancers. Specifically, beta-carotene consumption may help to prevent prostate cancer, breast cancer and stomach cancer, to name a few.
Maintain healthy teeth and gums
Munching on a carrot helps your mouth to produce more saliva, which helps to keep oral bacteria under control. This helps to keep your breath fresh, and your mouth free of disease.
Detoxify your system
Because of their vast nutritional profile, carrots are a great addition to a healthy detox regimen. You can juice them, add them to healthy salads or simply munch on them for a snack.
They’re great raw, or cooked by various methods
There are countless recipes in which carrots would be a welcome addition! They’re great raw in salads and slaws, steamed with your other favorite veggies, added to stews and soups, sauteed in stir fries and much more!
They go great in sweet and savory dishes 
Along with your favorite savory recipes, carrots go great in desserts. We’ve all heard of carrot cake, but carrots can also be added to healthy sorbet, cookie and parfait recipes. They can be caramelized with coconut crystals or honey and added to any dessert your imagination can fathom.
They make a yummy pickle!
All you need to make a quick pickle is some water, some sea salt and some apple cider vinegar. Cut carrots thinly and place in about eight cups of water, about 2/3 cup of apple cider vinegar and just under half a cup of sea salt. Marinade until you achieve the desired taste, and enjoy with any meal!
They add some color and pizzaz to your meals Carrots add brightness to your dishes. Along with the regular orange carrot, you can find yellow, red, purple, and white carrots to accent your meals however you wish.
They’re a great outlet for your creative knife skills
If you’ve got a flair for food art and creative plate presentation, carrots are a great canvas. They can be cut and shaved into flowers, stars, and more to impress guests and delight kids into eating their veggies.
They make a refreshing, nutritious juice
For a detox, carrot juice is an excellent staple. Even if you’re not detoxing, the juice of fresh organic carrots is sweet (but not too sweet), refreshing and simply delicious. You can drink this juice alone or add it to smoothies.
They’re easy to grow
Carrots are a very easy veggie to grow straight from the seed. A patch of garden, some water, some sunshine and they’ll be popping up before you know it. If you don’t have garden space, you can also grow carrots inside in a container. Smaller varieties of carrots work great for this purpose.
Have you eaten your carrots today?
–Tanya Rakhmilevich

7 Reasons You're Tired All The Time

7 Reasons You're Tired All The Time

Ever ask yourself "why am I so tired?" Here's what to look out for.


why am i always tired
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Photograph by Jamie Grill/getty images
We all tend to blame fatigue on a too-busy lifestyle. And much of the time we're right. But if you feel tired all the time or your always asking yourself "why am I so tired?", don't blow it off. Give yourself about 2 to 3 weeks to make some lifestyle changes: Get more sleep, trim your social calendar, eat more wholesome foods, drink more fluids, take a multivitamin, and cut back on caffeine and alcohol. (Try drinking this and sleep 90 minutes longer.) "If you're still feeling the symptoms of fatigue after those changes, then you need professional help," says Sandra Adamson Fryhofer, MD, an internal medicine doctor in Atlanta. Excess exhaustion could be the sign of a more serious medical condition that can be treated. (Looking to reclaim your energy? Prevention has smart answers—get a FREE trial + 12 FREE gifts.)
Here are the 7 most common problems you need to know about.

1. Anemia
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Photograph by joshya/shutterstock
 
1. Anemia
The fatigue caused by anemia is the result of a lack of red blood cells, which bring oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and cells. You may feel weak and short of breath. Anemia may be caused by an iron or vitamin deficiency, blood loss, internal bleeding, or a chronic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, or kidney failure. Women of childbearing age are especially susceptible to iron-deficiency anemia because of blood loss during menstruation and the body's need for extra iron during pregnancy and breastfeeding, explains Laurence Corash, MD, adjunct professor of laboratory medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.
The symptoms: Feeling tired all the time is a major one. Others include extreme weakness, difficulty sleeping, lack of concentration, rapid heartbeat, chest pains, and headache. Simple exercise, such as climbing the stairs or walking short distances, can cause fatigue.
The tests: A thorough evaluation for anemia includes a physical exam and blood tests, including a complete blood count (CBC), to check the levels of your red blood cells. It's also standard to check the stool for blood loss.
 
thyroid
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Photograph by SCIEPRO/getty images
 
2. Thyroid Disease
When your thyroid hormones are out of whack, even everyday activities will wipe you out. The thyroid gland, about the size of the knot on a man's tie, is found in the front of the neck and produces hormones that control your metabolism. Too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism), and metabolism speeds up. Too little (hypothyroidism), and metabolism slows down.
The symptoms: Hyperthyroidism causes muscle fatigue and weakness, which you may notice first in the thighs. Exercises such as riding a bike or climbing stairs become more difficult. Other symptoms include unexplained weight loss, feeling warm all the time, increased heart rate, shorter and less frequent menstrual flows, and increased thirst. Hyperthyroidism is most commonly diagnosed in women in their 20s and 30s, but it can occur in older women and men too, says Robert J. McConnell, MD, codirector of the New York Thyroid Center at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. Hypothyroidism causes fatigue, an inability to concentrate, and muscle soreness, even with minor activity. Other symptoms include weight gain due to water retention, feeling cold all the time (even in warmer weather), heavier and more frequent menstrual flows, and constipation. Hypothyroidism is most common in women over age 50; in fact, as many as 10% of women past 50 will have at least mild hypothyroidism, says McConnell.
The tests: Thyroid disease can be detected with a blood test. "Thyroid disorders are so treatable that all people who complain of fatigue and/or muscle weakness should have the test done," says McConnell.

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Photograph by ballyscanlon/getty images
 
3. Diabetes
More than a million people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes every year, but many more may not even know they have it. Sugar, also called glucose, is the fuel that keeps your body going. And that means trouble for people with type 2 diabetes who can't use glucose properly, causing it to build up in the blood. Without enough energy to keep the body running smoothly, people with diabetes often notice fatigue as one of the first warning signs, says Christopher D. Saudek, MD, professor of medicine and program director for the General Clinical Research Center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

The symptoms: Aside from feeling tired all the time , other signs include excessive thirst, frequent urination, hunger, weight loss, irritability, yeast infections, and blurred vision.
The tests: There are two major tests for diabetes. The fasting plasma glucose test, which is more common, measures your blood glucose level after fasting for 8 hours. With the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), blood is drawn twice: just before drinking a glucose syrup, then 2 hours later.
 
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Photograph by Tom Merton/getty images
 
4. Depression
More than "the blues," depression is a major illness that affects the way we sleep, eat, and feel about ourselves and others. Without treatment, the symptoms of depression may last for weeks, months, or even years.
The symptoms: We don't all experience depression in the same way. But commonly, depression can cause decreased energy, changes in sleeping and eating patterns, problems with memory and concentration, and feelings of hopelessness, worthlessness, and negativity. (These other 9 unexpected symptoms of depression are less common, but just as telling.)
The tests: There's no blood test for depression, but your doctor may be able to identify it by asking you a series of questions. If you experience five or more of these symptoms below for more than 2 weeks, or if they interfere with your life, see your doctor or mental health professional: fatigue or loss of energy; sleeping too little or too much; a persistent sad, anxious, or "empty" mood; reduced appetite and weight loss; increased appetite and weight gain; loss of interest or pleasure in activities once enjoyed; restlessness or irritability; persistent physical symptoms that don't respond to treatment, such as headaches, chronic pain, or constipation and other digestive disorders; difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions; feeling guilty, hopeless, or worthless; thoughts of death or suicide.
 
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Photograph by puwadol jaturawutthichai/shutterstock
 
5. Rheumatoid Arthritis
This autoimmune disease is not always easy to diagnose early, but there are some subtle clues to look for. Rheumatoid arthritis happens when your immune system turns against itself and attacks healthy joint tissue, sometimes resulting in irreversible damage to bone and cartilage.
The symptoms: Many symptoms (such as fatigue, low energy, loss of appetite, and joint pain) are shared by other health conditions, including other forms of arthritis such as fibromyalgia and lupus. Anemia and thyroid disorders, which also cause fatigue, are even more common in people with RA, according to John Klippel, MD, president and CEO of the Atlanta-based Arthritis Foundation. Rheumatologists look for at least four of the following criteria in diagnosing RA: morning stiffness in and around the joints lasting at least 1 hour before maximum improvement; at least three joint areas with simultaneous soft tissue swelling or fluid; at least one joint area swollen in a wrist, knuckle, or the middle joint of a finger; simultaneous involvement of the same joint areas on both sides of the body; lumps of tissue under the skin; and bone erosion in the wrist or hand joints, detected by x-ray.
The tests: A thorough physical exam by a rheumatologist can provide some of the most valuable evidence of the disease, but there is also a test for the presence of rheumatoid factor, an antibody found in the blood. About 80% of people with RA test positive for this antibody, but the test is not conclusive.
 
Chronic Fatigue
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Photograph by Johner Images/getty images
 
6. Chronic Fatigue
This baffling condition causes a strong fatigue that comes on quickly. People who suffer from CFS feel too tired to carry on with their normal activities and are easily exhausted with little exertion.
The symptoms: Other signs include headache, muscle and joint pain, weakness, tender lymph nodes, and an inability to concentrate. Chronic fatigue syndrome remains puzzling, because it has no known cause.
The tests: There is none. Your doctor must rule out other conditions with similar symptoms, such as lupus and multiple sclerosis, before making the diagnosis.
 
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Photograph by Juanmonino/gettyimages
 
7. Sleep Apnea
You could have this sleep-disrupting problem if you wake up feeling tired no matter how much rest you think you got. Sleep apnea is a disorder characterized by brief interruptions of breathing during sleep. In the most common type, obstructive sleep apnea, your upper airway actually closes or collapses for a few seconds, which, in turn, alerts your brain to wake you up to begin breathing again. Someone with obstructive sleep apnea may stop breathing dozens or even hundreds of times a night, says Roseanne S. Barker, MD, former medical director of the Baptist Sleep Institute in Knoxville,
The symptoms: Sleep apnea is often signaled by snoring and is generally followed by tiredness the next day. Because sleep apnea can lead to heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke, it's important to be tested.
The tests: This involves an overnight stay at a sleep clinic, where you'll undergo a polysomnogram, which is a painless test that will monitor your sleep patterns, breathing changes, and brain activity.

Summer Senior Celebration August 10


 
Pennsylvania House Of Representatives
Stay Informed Photos Visit My Website Contact Me

 
 
Summer Senior Celebration August 10
Area seniors are invited to my summer Senior Celebration, which will be held from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, August 10 at Watkins Center, 326 Watkins Ave., Upper Darby.

This is a great opportunity for seniors, their family members and caregivers to learn more about programs and services available to them in our community.
There will be resources for senior citizens, an ice cream social, and my staff will be on-site to provide state services and free notary service. We also will be taking photos for the new SEPTA senior ID cards.
This event is part of a series of Senior Celebration events I am hosting across the 164th Legislative District, including Simpson Gardens, Grace Court and Watkins Center.
For more information or to register, please call Maureen McGrory at 610-259-7016 or email mmcgrory@pahouse.net.
 
 
 


Rep. Margo Davidson
D-164th District
Delaware County
website




 

PA House of Representatives Democratic Caucus
 

Job Posting - Customer Service Representative

Please find attached a Customer Service Representative job posting for Law School Admission Council (LSAC).  This posting can be accessed at www.LSAC.org.

As noted on the posting, all résumés should be sent to the attention of C. Rommel for review, using the job code noted. Résumés can be faxed to 215-504-3808 or e-mailed to employment@LSAC.org.



Position Title:                      Candidate Services Representative (CSR)

Position Code:                     CSR

Primary Responsibilities:

Provides accurate, professional, courteous and timely responses to candidate inquiries and complaints via telephone and email for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam (MPRE) programs, and other LSAC candidate services. Efficiently processes LSAT and MPRE candidate transactions (e.g. registrations, orders, file changes etc.), researches and resolves candidate problems. 

Qualifications:

High School Diploma required; some college preferred; experience in telephone customer service highly desirable. Strong customer services skills including a clear speaking voice, strong language skills, excellent diction and tone. The ability to listen and empathize while diplomatically enforcing LSAC and MPRE policies, and strong writing skills required.  Strong data entry skills; accuracy a must. Spanish as a second language desirable.   Knowledge of MS Office, Windows, Adobe Acrobat and ability to work with LSAC applications, ability to interpret and analyze computer files and good judgmental skills required. Must have strong interpersonal skills and ability to work well with other staff as a team player in a call center environment.

Application Deadline:        Aug 8, 2016

How to apply:
C. Rommel, HR Section
Law School Admission Council
P.O. Box 40, Job Code CSR
Newtown, PA 18940
Fax: 215-504-3808